How to Prevent the “Performance Review Panic”

performance reviewAs we start winding down the 2015 business year, many of us have already started our year-end team member performance evaluations. Few employees actually look forward to the performance evaluation. In fact, when the words “performance review” are muttered, most employees will instantly tense up and begin to scroll through all the negatives in their heads. The only bright spot that may come to mind is the hope that the performance review results may lead to a bump in pay. One reason employees fear the review may be that they don’t know what to expect from the process. In order for you, the employer, and the employee to gain the most out of the review process, you’ll want to ensure they are relaxed and eager to participate. Here are a few tips to pass along to your team before a performance review:

It’s not just about the paperwork – Even though performance evaluations usually involve a certain amount of forms and documentation, these do not make up the entirety of the process. While paperwork has its place, remind employees that its not the point of the exercise.

Come prepared to participate – A performance review shouldn’t be a one-way conversation. At the very least, employees should gather their perspectives on their position and accomplishments and be prepared to discuss them with their supervisor. Preparation should include reviewing their job description, identifying significant achievements, and examining what may be preventing them from doing their best work.

Don’t save up issues – Your team should be talking to their supervisors all the time so everyone is consistently on the same page. If they only air complaints and/or ideas during the yearly performance review, a lot of time could be wasted in between. If you keep the lines of communication open throughout the year, there shouldn’t be any surprises when it comes time for a review.

Take an active role – An evaluation should be a healthy give-and-take session, sharing ideas and opinions freely. Employees should ask questions and take responsibility for understanding what you have to say.

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