Show the ‘Love’ to your Team – An Excerpt from PCH’s February Newsletter

praiseWe’ve previously referenced this great article by Ross McCammon titled, “The Power of Praise in Business- and How to Do it Right.” Since February is the month of love, we thought it was fitting to recap some of the main points of as a reminder to ‘show the love’ to your employees as well. You can find a link to the entire article by visiting our Facebook page ( PCH Facebook Page ), but here are our favorite points:

Why praise is important:
A 2010 Harvard Business Review study found that a 0.1 percent increase in employee engagement drove $100,000 in operating income to the bottom line (study was done on Best Buy Stores). Of all the various factors that can contribute to employee engagement, the study also found that simple recognition was the single most important factor.

How to give praise:
The article suggests that you should always balance praise with constructive feedback. “Recall a particular situation and describe a specific behavior.” Use these 3 guidelines:

Do it now – the closer the recognition is to the behavior, the more likely it will be repeated.
Do it often – The more you message what’s important to you, the people will focus on that.
Be Specific & Sincere.

Key Technical Matters:

The following list of praise guidelines is taken word for word from the article and was the source of many ‘LOL’ moments for me, so I’ve included it in its entirety:

Praise should not begin with the phrase “You da….”
Ending an expression of praise with “…and stuff” nullifies the praise
Ending an expression of praise with “…now get back to work” also nullifies the praise
In ascending order of forcefulness: e-mail, face-to-face conversation, handwritten note, bear hug
No bear hugs!!
A handwritten note is worth more than a $100 gift card
But probably not more than a $200 gift card
Go easy on the superlatives: “hardest-working,” “most glorious,” “awesomest,” “best-smelling,” etc
Praise followed by criticism is not praise
Praise followed by praise is probably a little too much praise
Praise followed by criticism followed by praise is a sandwich

To read the entire article, visit: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/222573

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